Tag Archives: depression

Putting Risk in Perspective

Many of us fool ourselves into believing we have some special persona, especially men, that we are some type of rugged, resourceful, independent character in complete control of our lives i.e. Daniel Boone or Davy Crockett.

For most individuals with a disability this concept hits even closer to home. In rehabilitation people struggle to regain some semblance of independence and control over their new situation. It’s not easy, but with great effort and persistence the idea develops and after years we fool ourselves into believing it.

Andy's dog Marz

Andy’s dog Marz

Last week my friend Andy, from Utah, who was kind enough to share his story with us, took his dog Marz for a “walk” as he often does in the winter. The “walk” consists of him dropping his dog off on a road that’s not used much and then drives on and Marz trots after the truck till it stops and then hops back in. Everything went according to plan. After Andy had driven a while he stopped, and the dog jumped in.   I’ll let Andy take it from here:

The dog had a good walk and I was backing up to an area where I could get turned around. There is plenty of snow up here and I got one back tire off the road and got stuck. If I could have gotten out of my pick-up and shoveled, I could have gotten out in 5 minutes. Not so and unfortunately, I was just out of cell phone range. That was around 4:30 pm Tuesday. I figured somebody would eventually come, it took a while though. I had less than a half of a tank of gas and felt I should ration it as much as possible. It got dark and the coldest I saw it get was 8⁰. It is really kind of amazing how warm you can keep a pick-up with you and a shaggy dog inside. Marz was concerned, she knew something was up, and after her initial romp outside, she would not leave the pick-up. She is also trained not to get into the front seat and there was no way to cuddle with her. So, Tuesday night I slide over to the passenger seat because it has a heater. I kind of made it through the night unscathed. I listened to 8 hours of a book on tape. The stars were great!

Andy in his truck

Andy in his truck

My problem was catheters. I did not bring my cathing stuff and by about 10 pm things were already getting uncomfortable. I was pretty clammy the results of dysreflexia but dealt with it. I think the dysreflexia was good and bad. It kept my heart rate up helping me stay warm, but was not very comfortable. I did have one lubricated, self- contained catheter. Unfortunately, it had been in my truck a long time and was not very lubricated anymore. I struggled for about an hour in the dark trying to get that thing in with no success. Without my tools and fingers that don’t work very well it is hard. So, by morning I had leaked all over. I cannot begin to tell you how much I hate the smell of pee. It is really stinky when you sit in it for hours.

The sun comes up and brings optimism and much needed heat. I was not in the direct sun and my pickup read 16⁰ at 1 pm and 30⁰ at 5 pm. Yes, I sat there the whole day on Wednesday, and nobody came by. I am not for sure if it was a mistake or a good thing, but I snagged that old catheter and slowly was able to work it in. Lots of spit and I rubbed it with the urine from my underwear. How is that for being resourceful. It still was very stubborn. I can’t imagine what I did to my urethra by doing that. And of course, it definitely was not a sterile procedure. I did drain about my max of 500 ml’s. I had nothing to drink either or pills, but I think I resolved my full bladder issue.

I confess I was a little depressed when, after a whole day nobody came by and I knew I had to make it another night. It is amazing how fast a Urinary Track Infection (UTI) kicks in by introducing germs that way. By 8 pm I was shaking terribly, had terrible cold sweats and knew my butt was not happy anymore. 24 hours in a pickup seat sitting in your own urine is not good for the butt. I knew I was in for a long bad night.

Fortunately, my friends, that call me all the time got worried when I had no cell signal. At 10 pm they called the sheriff. The sheriff was able to ping my last phone signal. Search and rescue found me pretty quick. I told them to just take me to the hospital. My body temp was 90⁰ at first and my blood pressure was pretty high. I told the ER nurse going in I was pretty rank. I had peed all over myself. They warmed me up, cleaned me up, gave me an antibiotic, patched my butt (it was not too bad), and sent me on my way. …

There can be this huge helpless feeling at times being in a wheelchair to the point of breaking you down. I hate having my disability dictate how I run my life. All my friends said just send them a text and let them know where I am going and let them know I made it. I choose to live my life the way I do… I do numerous things that could get me in trouble which the able- bodied person can’t even begin to understand. I don’t want to text somebody every time I push the limits a little. But I definitely do not want to die freezing to death. At least not anytime soon, it was hard. If I am freezing to death, I don’t want to have a fever at the same time or a pressure sore forming on my butt. Really made it complicated. I don’t think I would have had another night in me, but I never lost hope somebody would show up. Makes me feel lucky I have people that love and care for me.

So, do you think that warrants cheating death. Maybe not quit there but getting close. If my truck would have quit working it would have been slow and more painful, probably death. So, what do you think; am I a guy that you may think is just too crazy or stupid? I think one goes hand in hand with the other. My motto is we are here to live life, not watch it go by. Being in a wheelchair brings that to a whole new level. I do think there are ways to mitigate risk. Trying to explain that to an able body person is really hard. Fear can paralyze you, but gives us the opportunity to excel. I definitely think very few people want to live with the risks I do. I understand that and that is okay. I don’t want to live a sedentary lifestyle.”

Risk exists for all of us. For an individual confined to a wheelchair who is determined to be active risks can catapulted one back to the reality of how helpless and dependent we really are. For many risk worth taking because as the Poem says: “Only a person who risks is free.”

Andy’s survival is a testimony to his resourcefulness, but as he says “risk can be mitigated.” There are several companies which, for a nominal fee, will provide a pendant which can be worn and when activated can locate your position anywhere in the United States and send help. A small Survival Kit can be put together and carried on a wheelchair or in a glove box of a vehicle. The lesson here is to prepare yourself ahead of time not, not to risk.

Andy Kayaking Thanksgiving Day 2018

Andy Kayaking Thanksgiving Day 2018

The Struggle Within the Struggle

Most people have no idea what it is like to live with a disability. Every day is a struggle in itself. Some individuals are aware of the obvious challenges, most are unaware of the less obvious majority. I recently read that John McCain, whose range of motion had been severely limited by the torture he received while a prisoner of war in Vietnam, had to have another person comb his hair because he could not lift his arms above his shoulders.

Senator Tammy Duckworth

Senator Tammy Duckworth

Many disabilities are visible at first glance. If the individual, when in public, presents well, seems to be in “control” and well-adjusted to their situation people often think to themselves, that’s wonderful or will say “Wow, I could never do that!” Neither could be further from the truth. First, anyone has all the abilities they need to deal with a severe crisis, already in each one of us. When talking to students I will often ask if people like Gabby Giffords, Tammy Duckworth, Jaycee Dugard or John McCain, individuals who not only survived horrendous challenges in their lives, but they went on to become examples of strength and fortitude to others received something special at birth that nobody else got. If the answer is no, which of course it is, then that same strength and courage is in each of us.

Returning to the person with the disability who presents so well in public, it is easy to understand why people come to believe that’s what their day to day life is like. For most, like quadriplegics, nothing could be further the truth.   Every day involves a varying degree of challenges. There is always frustration, anxiety and at times depression. Lack of strength and range of motion issues is a constant problem for many.  Pain, of varying intensity, including phantom pain in areas that have been amputated or paralyzed is not uncommon. Individuals with high spinal cord injuries (SCI) bodies are unable to control their body temperature, have trouble regulating their blood pressure and are usually constantly cold regardless of environmental temperature. There is a myriad of other issues both mental and physical which present from time to time. This is our “normal”. However, one should remember, no matter how bad things are many can pull themselves together when in public which just helps perpetuate the myth.  But, for the individual there is always something to deal with.

SEARCHING FOR SIMPLICITY

It was already a little after 10 AM when I rolled out on our deck. I follow a similar ritual almost every morning. It begins by my trying to warm my body. Direct sunlight in good weather and the fireplace in winter. Next is my intake of caffeine, a bottle of diet Mountain Dew and a cup of coffee to get my body working for the day. It is also a time when I muse about what is going on in my life, the world, our country or whatever. It was immediately obvious that this was going to be the nicest day of 2018 so far. Bright sunshine, no wind and the temperature that was predicted to climb to around 80. My eyes wandered to the nesting boxes not far from the deck and I noticed a swallow sitting on one of them. In the next instant another one came darting out of one of the box and landed in the flat area around my garden boxes which was closer to me. Watching I realized it was the female and she was gathering material to build her nest. She’d pick up some dead grass or weed, fly back to the box and repeat the process over and over again. While she was doing this the male sat on a nearby box seemingly aloof to the whole process. Typical my wife would say. Occasionally, she would fly up and perch next to him seemingly to confirm their relationship, then they would take off into the air darting to and fro seeming to celebrate their existence.

Male Swallow

Male Swallow

I began wondering what it would be like to live a life that was that simple. Fly north in the spring, build a nest, raise your young, raise a second batch if there were time, then fly south as the cold weather returned. Swallows must’ve been doing this for thousands of years with little deviation.

At 75 you would think that one’s life would be getting simpler. However, the exact opposite seems to be true for me. It’s not like my thoughts are complicated by the fact that I’m in the twilight years of my life because death does not weigh on my mind. I have no idea what will happen to me when I die, but the one thing I know is that I’ll be out of this damn wheelchair. Living seems to be complicated by many factors for me. The thousands of daily frustrations that come along with spinal cord injury. They don’t seem to be getting better. My desire to enjoy as many of the activities that provide me quality of life. The ebb and flow of relationships in my life seems to be a constant strain lately. Sitting on the deck in the warm sun I’m jealous of the swallows for their seemingly simplistic existence and their love of life.

Fly By

Fly By

Open Letter to A Good Friend

Steve & me at Payne LakeMaybe by explaining it to you I can come to understand it better myself. I have a lot of sadness. How it presents in my mind is influenced by many factors. I’m not sure, but it seems to be becoming more prevalent either with growing older or as my years as a quadriplegic increase or both. I find myself longing for some of the abilities of my former life, like independence, freedom, spontaneity and self-reliance. Truly, if I have any part of these they are mere shadows of what they used to be. Oh, I forgot the most important one is control. That’s the issue! What control do I have in my life? Really?

Mental control, I feel, I have more of and most of the time it allows me to keep the other at a distance. Physical control, however, of my overall environment is really lacking. What I can do by myself is limited. Within a mile of my house in either direction are steep hills which once down I could not get back up. To leave, in the van, means someone must be driving me. My four-wheel drive chair, even in my local environment, also has limited physical boundaries. Most of the activities away from home require a supporting cast while activities in the home also require occasional assistance now and then.

At times, when these limiting factors seem to become overwhelming and I feel things are out of control I tend to become passive aggressive a condition I often had to deal with with my special education students Defined on Google as: of or denoting a type of behavior or personality characterized by indirect resistance to the demands of others and an avoidance of direct confrontation, as in procrastinating, pouting, or misplacing important materials.

Commonly, I will respond negatively taking action over the things I do have control of, even though at the time I know the action is not in my best interest. Most often it involves cancelling doctor appointments, my participation in activities or events I have been preparing for and really want to be a part of or just refusing to do what I should do. I feel better briefly and then wonder what the hell did I do that for and my only thought is “Because I can.”

Simple Gifts*

The song Simple Gifts is a hymn written in the 1840s by a member of the Shaker Community. The Shakers were a religious sect that migrated to America from England in the late 1700s. Their religious principles focused around being satisfied with the simplistic existence and the natural environment. The community produced a lot of very simple items which they sold to maintain their existence. The items stressed simplicity and functionality. You may have even heard of Shaker furniture which is still prized today by many people.

Every season seems to bring with it particular “simple gifts”. This spring was no exception. I have been struggling with an extended period of depression, but with the arrival of spring came certain “gifts” that I always look forward to. One of the earliest is, after a long, cold winter, just sitting in the warmth of the sun and feeling my body warm. (Sitting In The Mornin’ Sun)

Another of nature’s simple gifts is the arrival of the birds which have migrated south for the winter. Many of those returning are notable because of their beautiful colors such as the Baltimore oriole, the Rose Breasted Grosbeak and the Indigo Bunting. Being confined to a wheelchair encourages one to spend more time bird watching than when able-bodied. Two of my favorite species to observe are not brilliantly colored, but are enjoyable to watch because of their fascinating behavior and their willingness to live close to man. Since my injury, we have done much to encourage birds to share our environment with us. Every year swallows, set up house in the same nesting box. I have written about them before too. I love to watch them in flight because of their ability to change direction instantly darting left and right as they pursue insects. It’s hard to watch them fly and not believe they are enjoying every second of their lives. While the female is sitting on the eggs the male, who I have named Captain America, sits on top of the eagle on the top of the flagpole and will defend the nest against all comers.

Baltimore oriole at our feeder

Baltimore oriole at our feeder

Captain American

Captain American

The birds, however, that I enjoy watching the most are the House Wrens. Last spring my wife went out to hang some clothes from a clothesline. She reached for a clothespin and realized there were a bunch of sticks protruding from the bag. She slowly opened it and saw it was a bird’s nest with three eggs nestled in the sticks. After some searching on the Internet we discovered it was the nest of house wrens and spent much of the summer observing their behavior. This year, being unable to find the clothespin bag we hung out a <a that I had made during the winter in the exact same spot and were not disappointed as the wrens quickly began building their nest in it.

A female house wren bringing in a sack of spider eggs into the nest. It’s believed that when the spiders hatch, they eat some of the mites that have been brought in by the adults and then when they get bigger they are eaten by the growing wrens.

With both the wrens and the swallows, the males participate in the raising of the young. Below is a video I took last year and last week, which looked like the final day of nest building. The female is now sitting on the eggs while the male spends much of his time sitting on the laundry line poles waiting for the eggs to hatch. Once hatched both the male swallow and wren are totally involved in feeding the chicks and protecting the nest. We have no way of knowing if these are the same birds from last year.

What I enjoy so much about watching these birds is their devotion to each other, raising the young and their seeming enjoyment of life itself even though it’s hard work and demanding. While we humans are ever striving to modernize our lives and gain more possessions, the habits and purposes of these birds have changed very little over time. I think we could all benefit by not being so quick to adopt change for change’s sake to improve our daily lives and be happier with the simple gifts. And, oh yes, the time spent observing and videotaping the birds goes a long way to improving my outlook on life.

*All of the pictures and videos contained in this blog were taken on our property

Alternative Facts

Alternative Facts

Alternative Facts

“I Don’t Want To Be Me Today”

Struggling

Struggling

Those were the words I whispered to my nurse in the shower this morning. I was in the midst of a panic attack which had started shortly after I woke up. Early on after my injury I had them all the time, but now I only get one or two a month. At the earliest signs I have learned to take the medication prescribed for them. Waiting, hoping it will go away only allows it to get more developed. Once the symptoms start, it’s just a matter of time. I’ve never been diagnosed with PTSD, but I have most of the symptoms. They usually begin with my legs. There is an overpowering, all-consuming urge to move them and at times, like today, that’s combined with the fact that they feel like solid cement. There are no words to convey the overpowering attitude that takes over my mind. These attacks are characterized by facial distortions, crying and the feeling of being totally out of control. Sometimes I thrash and want to throw myself out of bed, but it is impossible because of the quadriplegia. It scares the hell out of me.

At times like this I have seriously considered smoking marijuana in an effort to totally change the way I feel. I have never smoked it before and am anxious about my mind would react to it. Craig Hospital, where I did my rehabilitation, is strongly opposed to marijuana use by those who have been paralyzed.

This morning it took almost 3 hours for my medication to take effect. The peaceful calm that I feel when it kicks in is a welcome relief to the terrible anxiety I have been feeling. Usually, after I’m up I get tired and fall asleep for a while. The struggle one goes through can only be understood by one who has been through it. It’s all consuming.
The question at this point becomes what can one do about it? The feeling, while it is going on, is like being possessed and rational thought is impossible. Well-meaning intentions of others are irrelevant. It’s been over 17 years now and I have no idea or advice for dealing with these. The only good thing about them is that they always end.